Anticipated Traffic Impacts of Light Rail Transit (LRT) on Hamilton

Challenge:
How might the LRT project affect traffic on the LRT Corridor and alternative routes, the economic growth of the downtown core, and provide health and environmental benefits to the community?

Student Names:
Anastasia Soukhov, Cole Bondarewski, Chris Leung, Amanda Reale, Mike Wang, Julian Riano, Stanley Qian, Andrea Giampuzzi, Justin Lawrence, Andres Alvarez

Staff Member:
Kris Jacobson, Acting Director, LRT Project Coordination

Instructor:
Moataz Mohamed

Course and Department:
CIVENG 4T04 Transportation Engineering II: Modelling, Transit, and ITS


The Hamilton LRT project is part of the Ontario government’s commitment to expanding transit in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area. This project presents a great opportunity for students to study the effects of the LRT on different aspects of the community. Questions surrounding projected traffic congestion, property values, anticipated employment growth, and improved environmental conditions due to decreased daily travel times and fuel consumption, can be explored.

Students of the McMaster Transportation Engineering class created a traffic simulation of the current and projected conditions on a section of King Street near McMaster University. They used statistical models to project current traffic data into the future. Students optimized LRT riders' travel times using a micro traffic simulation model. They consulted literature for additional traffic assignment modelling assumptions and reviewed literature discussing the economic and environmental impacts of the LRT project on Hamilton's community. 

Next students will generate suggestions to highlight the impacts of LRT and share their findings with community stakeholders. 

       Traffic assignment equilibrium loop

       Traffic assignment equilibrium loop

                                                                           Hamilton LRT Render

                                                                           Hamilton LRT Render

                                           Traffic simulation of projected data using Synchro 5

 

                                        Traffic simulation of projected data using Synchro 5

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Your First Days in Hamilton Application: A Digital Tool to Help Newcomers Find Relevant Local Services

Challenge:
How can immigrant and refugee newcomers to Hamilton find information about relevant services, resources, and programs in a timely manner?
Hamilton view from the mountain

Hamilton view from the mountain

Student Names:
Bohan Gou, Julian A Fernandez M, Sebastian Rojas, Abdullah Mousavi

Staff Member:
Sarah Wayland, Senior Project Manager, Immigration Partnership, Healthy and Safe Communities Department

Community Partner:
Lily Martin-Lumsden, Senior Regional Manager, YMCA

 

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Community Partner:
Lily Martin-Lumsden, Senior Regional Manager, YMCA

Instructor:
Joe Varrasso, Esteve Hassan

Course and Department:
Software Engineering Project (Comp CO867), CSAIT

Mock up of the your first days in Hamilton app

Mock up of the your first days in Hamilton app

 

Newcomers to Hamilton require access to services to help them ease their transition. Many new immigrants and refugees experience difficulties finding and accessing the many services available to them. While there is a wealth of information available, it can be difficult to access in an easily organized and central way, particularly for those who are new to the city.

Students of the Software Engineering program at Mohawk College - Bohan, Julian, Sebastian, and Abdullah created an application to help newcomers find these resources, by creating a graphical user interface, and a newly designed home page for their application.

Next they will consult with the Hamilton Immigration Partnership Council to further develop their design and content and explore further collaboration. 

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Wellness and Engagement in City Housing: Aging Successfully Though Enhanced Wellness Programming

Challenge:
What barriers do people experience in accessing the wellness programs, and how can CityHousing support resident engagement?

Students:
Robert Etherington, Zoe Grant, Coomal Rashid, Gagandeep Saini

Staff:
Kelly Coxson, Community Development Coordinator, CityHousing Hamilton

Instructor:
Kate Whalen

Course and Department:
Sustainability 4S06: Leadership in Sustainability, Academic Sustainability Programs

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Exercise class poster created by the Wellness and Engagement in CityHousing Hamilton group

Exercise class poster created by the Wellness and Engagement in CityHousing Hamilton group

The results from the in-person resident surveys, highlighting the most significant barriers to accessing the wellness programs

The results from the in-person resident surveys, highlighting the most significant barriers to accessing the wellness programs

Students Robert, Zoe, Coomal, and Gagandeep conducted and coded 34 resident interviews, in order to discover potential barriers to engagement. They developed promotional material that was translated into two different languages and as their development culminated over a 3 week trial, they found a 10% increase in participation with their new promotional material. Afterwards, the students compiled a Recommendations Report for Kelly Coxson (the Community Project Champion), and the CHH Board to summarize their findings, as well as highlighting their next steps. 

Next the students will highlight 3 key recommendations on the report to the CHH and set up an online system for promotional material editing and templates and instructions, which will ensure the continuity of this project. 

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Welcome to Hamilton: Mapping the Narratives of Immigrant and International Student Communities

Challenge:
Where do the immigrant and international student populations reside and congregate, and how do these communities access information?
Where is Hamilton?

Where is Hamilton?

Student Names:
Saima Ahmad, Justin Axent-Saipovski, Rachel Cheung, Michael Dennis, Yousif Eliya, Aditya Harchand, Rebecca Hicks, Sabrina Musto

Staff Member:
Tammy Hwang (Business Development Officer, Global Hamilton)

Instructor:
Margaret Secord, Cole Gately

Course and Department:
Health Sciences 3DD6, Engaging the City

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Immigrants positively affect and diversify our communities by adding skills to the local labour force, while also increasing the size and productivity of the local economy. Immigrants are not only vital for the development of the community due to their work and educational backgrounds, but also for their innovation and ability to enrich cultural life. The City of Hamilton created Global Hamilton to 1) raise awareness of Hamilton as an immigration destination, 2) promote entrepreneurship and 3) help engage newcomers and immigrant communities to connect with the city. That being said, connecting with and engaging newcomers to Hamilton can be an ongoing challenge.

Saima, Justin, Rachel, Michael, Yousif, Aditya, Rebecca, and Sabrina identified areas where immigrant and international student populations have chosen to reside and congregate within Hamilton. They then developed strategies of engagement and located resources that are available to newcomers within the Hamilton area. Finally the students looked at cities demographically similar to Hamilton and how they have attempted challenges such as newcomer population retention.

Next the students of the Health Sciences Engaging the City class will create marketing and communication plans to reach international students and newcomers about events, projects, and initiatives happening in Hamilton. They are planning to collaborate with upper year McMaster University students to build a primary research project, where researchers will coordinate and execute focus groups and face to face interviews with immigrant communities.

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Value for Money: Is the City of Hamilton Receiving Value for Money from the Sewer Lateral Management Program (SLMP)?

Challenge:
Is the City of Hamilton Receiving Value for Money from the Sewer Lateral Management Program?
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Sewer Lateral Management diagram

Sewer Lateral Management diagram

Student Names:
Jake Bakker, Brianna Burke, Alfonso Coto, Matthew Dawe, Curtis Debonte, Michael Ferreira, Rosemarie Fritz, Hailey Jo Mantel, Johnathan Retsinas, Gloria Robinson, Neal Shepherd, Stephen Speelman, Alex Wouda.

Staff:
Amy Bodner, Performance Auditor, Audit Services Division, City Manager’s Office

Patricia Leishman, Manager, Process Improvement & Quality, Public Works Department

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Instructor:
Wayne Solomon

Course and Department: BUS 415 – Advanced Assurance Services, Business Department

To review the existing SLMP and ascertain, from a high level, what audit objectives, scope and methodology would look like if an audit were performed to ascertain if the City is receiving value for money from this program. Identify some of the risks of the program, how they might be investigated and provide a summary of pertinent issues to be addressed in the planning documents.

Students of the business department at Redeemer University College examined the existing policies and identified gaps in available information in the Sewer Lateral Management Program by analyzing current documents and overviewing Hamilton's current process. 

Next the students will determine how the testing of a value for money audit would be implemented and they will discover what source documents would be required to complete such an audit. Finally they will develop a partnership plan where students can test their high level analysis with stakeholders. 

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Red Light, Green Light

Challenge:
How can we minimize the impact of the LRT on the major signalized intersections of the downtown core?
Lights

Lights

Student Names:
Kerianne Hagan, Jessica Middleton, Jedursha Thurappah, Peter Ivankovic, Alyson King

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Staff Member:
Kris Jacobson, Acting Director, LRT Project Coordination

Instructor:
Moataz Mahmoud

Course and Department:
Civil Engineering 4T04: Transportation Engineering II - Modelling Transit and ITS

Traffic simulation of projected data using Synchro 5

Traffic simulation of projected data using Synchro 5

Kerianne, Jessica, Jedursha, Peter and Alyson - Civil Engineering students at McMaster University, counted vehicles at the five major intersections of Catherine, John, James, MacNab and Bay. They then modelled construction drawings of the proposed layout and input their collected data using the Synchro 5 software. This optimized the traffic signals of the 5 intersections to give the LRT priority. 

Next they will generate suggestions to highlight the impacts of LRT and share these findings with community stakeholders. 

Rendering of LRT

Rendering of LRT

LRT B-line Map

LRT B-line Map

Corner of King and Wellington Street, Hamilton

Corner of King and Wellington Street, Hamilton

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Increasing McMaster Students’ Use of SoBi Through Lifestyle Choices: Engaging Students in an Active Lifestyle

Challenge:
How can we get more students at McMaster University to incorporate physical activity into their day to day lives?
Students on the  SoBi  riding through McMaster Campus

Students on the SoBi riding through McMaster Campus

Students:
Nicole Crimi, Brian Zheng, Mostafa Mohammed, Daniel Park

Staff:
Don Curry, Health Promotion Specialist, Healthy and Safe Communities

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Pete Topalovic, Project Manager - Sustainable Mobility, Planning and Economic Development

Course and Department:
Innovation By Design (HTH SCI 4ID3), Department of Health Sciences

 
Students working on the project

Students working on the project

Physical activity affects many components of one’s health, and is something that through time, people have been consistently short of. This is prevalent in Hamilton when one considers that over 50% of car trips taken within the city are less than 1 km in distance. This has an effect on citizens’ health through increased pollution and increased non-communicable disease incidence such as cardiovascular disease and obesity. At the same time, when speaking with members of the community, it is clear that it is often difficult to visualize where active transit can fit in one’s life. Therefore, a strategy to engage citizens and help bring active transit closer to them is ideal.

Nicole, Brian, Mostafa and Daniel interviewed 8 McMaster students to understand goals, pain-points and ideas. They analyzed interview information and used empathy maps to develop key focus points, questions to tackle and design principles which were used in the development of our prototype. We aimed to use what we learned from the interviews to make our prototype user-oriented. Through a design-thinking approach they developed an app prototype which aims to engage students in an active lifestyle catered to their needs and interests. We shared this prototype with four McMaster students and stakeholders in order to obtain feedback and ideas for improvement. The students created a pilot website catered to the interests of students and locations around McMaster University to create a social network oriented around active transportation by presenting multiple points of interest that are accessible by SoBi Bikeshare. 

Next the Innovation by Design students will add maps with the locations of SoBi  stations to the website, and develop a method of keeping the website updated with information on events and points of interest. They are looking to partner with a software developer in order to extend website to an app in the future. Finally they hope to share pilot website with students/stakeholders at a McMaster event and market its presence by incorporating an incentives/rewards program in partnership with local businesses. 

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Mohawk College Community Project in Partnership with City Housing Hamilton

Challenge:
How might we provide excellent student learning opportunities while providing cost-effective renovations to CityHousing units to meet the
community need?
Mohawk student cutting trim to size

Mohawk student cutting trim to size

Student Names:
All second year students in the Building Renovation Technician Program

Staff Members:
Matt Bowen (Manager, Tenant Engagement & Support Services) & Brian Kinaschuk (Manager of Operations, CityHousing)

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Instructor:
Mark Lucking, John Deelstra, Brad MacDonald

Course and Department:
Construction Engineering Technician - Building Renovation – 462

Mohawk instructor teaching a student on-site

Mohawk instructor teaching a student on-site

While there is high demand for subsidized housing in Hamilton, CityHousing Hamilton has units that are not lived in because they need costly renovations and updates.

Students in their second year of the Building Technician Renovation Program at Mohawk College, are continuing their collaboration with CityHousing Hamilton to renovate city housing units that are unsuitable for use until renovations are complete. At this point schedules have been made and students are regularly working on job sitesDemolition and cleaning have been completed where necessary. Construction is well under way with the flooring having been replaced, and doors and trim being installed.

Next the students will install kitchens within both units including countertops and appliances. They will also renovate the bathrooms and install tiling, toilets, and general functionality while ensuring the space is a livable environment for families in need. 

Mohawk students installing a doorframe.

Mohawk students installing a doorframe.

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Growing Bridges: Improving Regional Food Security by Increasing Engagement at the McQuesten Urban Farm

Challenge:
What are the barriers that McQuesten residents experience when engaging with the McQuesten Urban Farm?

Students:
Muhammed Aydin, Katheleen Eva, Jethro Krause, Ikra Saeed

Staff:
Adam Watson: Project Manager, Neighbourhood Action Strategy   Jocelyn Strutt: Project Manager, Neighbourhood Action Strategy

Instructor:
Kate Whalen

Course and Department:
Sustainability 4S06: Leadership in Sustainability, Academic Sustainability Programs

Response to the question- “Is there something in particular that you’d like them to do at the farm to help engage you?” (Carrot = 2 persons) (Created by Ikra Saeed)

Response to the question- “Is there something in particular that you’d like them to do at the farm to help engage you?” (Carrot = 2 persons) (Created by Ikra Saeed)

A 2010 report highlights that 24 million individuals in North America alone live in a food desert, locations in which access to affordable, healthy food options are limited or nonexistent. Furthermore, many of these individuals were found to be of lower socioeconomic status. The McQuesten neighbourhood in Hamilton, Ontario has been perceived by its community members to be a food desert, with the closest grocery store being over a 20-minute walk away. The McQuesten Urban Farm was created with the purpose of building the capacity of the community, increasing food security, and reinforcing that everyone has a right to nutritious food. However, there is lower than anticipated engagement among community members. This project’s research will focus specifically on those that live within CityHousing Hamilton (CHH) and nearby Melvin Avenue apartment buildings.

Muhammed, Kathleen, Jethro and Ikra from the McMaster's program in Sustainability hosted conversations with local researchers and experts on food security and community engagementconducted surveys in the McQueensten neighbourhood in three CityHousing Hamilton including one high rise apartment community: 4 days, 281 doors, 76 resident interviews. They used this data to create hypothesis and implementation engagement strategies as well as a customer management tool and volunteer tracking management tool to improve data gathering. They then created and distributed improved marketing materials and research results to the local community. 

Next the students will integrate the tools created into the upcoming growing season at the McQuesten Urban Farm, so that data based decision making can continue to improve operations while exploring further partnerships through CityLAB to continue to increase engagement levels. 

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Green Wave: Improving Travel Times Using Signal Timing Optimization

Challenge:
The challenge (and goal) is to identify and recommend signal timing improvements to improve vehicular corridor progression and reduce average delays
Students taking measurements

Students taking measurements

Students:
Ivan Balaban, Eric Bentzen-Bilkvist, Krystian Biernat, Sebastian Biernat, Nathaniel Booth, Andrew Brown, Elizabeth Di Tella, Ivan Drewnitski, Trina Fernandes, Dhaval Harpal, Jonathan Holmes, Shajin Jahan, Khang (Brian) Le, Rabin Maskey, Derek Napoli, Smit Vinodbhai Patel, Anil Kumar Pau, Padma Priya Prabha Haridas, Thair Shaqour, Christopher Toews, Brad Van Bendegem, Joshua Van Ravens, Dinesh Wagle, Mateusz Zalewski

Staff:
Jeff Cornwell, Project Manager, Traffic Signals, Roads & Traffic Division, Public Works

Instructor:
Sean Nix

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Course and Department:
TRAN 10000 (Traffic Engineering 4), School of Engineering Technology (Building and Construction Sciences)

Student taking notes in the field

Student taking notes in the field

Sections of Mohawk Road and Upper Paradise Road are currently under review to determine if improved efficiencies can be implemented with respect to signal times.

Students from the Mohawk College's School of Engineering Technology used the traffic modelling software (Sychro 10) provided by the City of Hamilton which assembles and distributes the turning movement counts (TMCs) and signal timing plans in order to study area intersections and analyze and implement traffic modelling. They also conducted field visits to validate TMCs, signal timing plans and (using a probe vehicle) travel time and delay through the two corridors and calibrated a traffic capacity analysis and vehicular progression model to existing conditions

Next the engineering students will prepare a “recommended scenario” traffic model containing signal timing parameters that will be recommended to improve vehicular corridor progression and reduce average delays as well as preparing a technical memorandum summarizing study process, findings and recommendations which will be presented to city staff. 

Google Street View at Mohawk and Upper Paradise Road

Google Street View at Mohawk and Upper Paradise Road

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School Site Design Study: Impact of School Site Paved Surface Area on Travel Mode Choice

Challenge:
Is there any relation between paved surface area of school sites and the modes of transportation used to get to school?
Observing the number of vehicles coming and going

Observing the number of vehicles coming and going

Students:
Mina Mahdavi, Kamaldeep Kaur

Staff Member:
Kelly Scott, Physical Activity Specialist, Healthy Environments Division, Healthy & Safe Communities Department

Instructor:
Gail Krantzburg

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Course and Department:
Thesis project, W. Booth School of Engineering and Practice

 

In the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA), there has been a steady decline in walking to and from school over the past 25 years, as children are increasingly dropped off and picked up by car. Data drawn from the 1986 to 2011 Transportation Tomorrow Survey shows that walking among 11 to 13 year olds in Hamilton has decreased from 58% in 1986 to 39% in 2011. This increase in car travel mode share to school in the GTHA, has added significant car traffic volume to roads during the morning peak period. Now schools are the second biggest car trip generator in the morning commute forming 22% of morning peak traffic, second only to workplaces, in the GTHA.

This project builds on the previous study “School Site Design and Travel Mode Choice: A Comparison of Objective and Subjective Measures of Walk ability of Schools in the Hamilton Area” completed February 2017.  The draft hypothesis for this project is “as the amount of school site motorized vehicle paved surface area increases so too does the use of motorized vehicles to the school site and surrounding streets”.  The information is intended to inform decisions about school site design that promotes the greatest mode share of walking and cycling, while reducing personal motorized vehicle use. 

  • Research indicates that there is a link between the built environment, and individual and population health
  • Sedentary behaviour and physical inactivity have been linked to an increased risk of chronic diseases
  • Travel by motorized vehicles (personal vehicles & school buses) negatively impacting pedestrian and cyclist safety
  • Motorized vehicles contribute to air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions that adversely impact respiratory and cardiac health
  • Availability of free parking and ‘kiss-and-rides” increases the use of motorized vehicles

Mina and Kamaldeep received ethics approval from the McMaster Research Ethics Office and the municipal school boards to observe 14 schools and collect data on the relationship between paved surfaces and modes of transportation. They will next interpret the data to determine relationships and provide recommendations for schools based on their findings. 

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